Wednesday, May 23, 2018


Spring Plant Sale
Saturday May 26th 9am - 12pm
The parking lot of Dufferin Mutual Insurance, 712 Main St. East


There will be a selection of hardy perennials that are acclimatized to the Shelburne area.
Typical plants are: Hostas, Heuchera, Iris, Phlox, Day Lilies and ground cover.

Do you have some gardening questions?  Not sure where to start?
Come out and meet some of our members and get your questions answered.




Friday, March 23, 2018

First Meeting for 2018

Trish Symons was our speaker for our March meeting and she shared some great tips, beautiful pictures and some laughs as always.

"Edit out what no longer works".  
Are you bored with certain plants?
Are you frustrated with certain areas?
Do you have plants that are not happy with where they are planted?

  • Everyone loves spring, seeing that first pop of colour after the winter always brings such joy. Trish suggests planting some kind of new spring bulb each year so that you have something new to discover in the spring.  There are ton of new varieties of tulips and hyacinth and pansies to choose from.



 


          Avignon parrot tulip

  • Are you bored with older varieties? Maybe there is a new varieties that excites you.  Such as this Apricot Peony from Trish's garden - absolutely stunning!
Photo by Trish Symons www.trishsymons.com
  • Don't fight the environment that you are working with - if the plant isn't happy in that location try something different.  She shared that one part of her garden didn't seem to want to grow things even though she was amending the soil and spending a lot of time and effort.  So she has created a beautiful scree garden that is full of cactus and succulents.  Aren't these blooms gorgeous?

 Photo by Trish Symons www.trishsymons.com
Photo by Trish Symons www.trishsymons.com

Try something completely new - you never know it might become your new favourite.
  • Plant tulips and alliums with hostas.  The hosta leaves hide the other plants dying leaves as they emerge.
  • Consider plants that have interesting textures or colours in their structure, leaves or bark. This gives you more interest through out the seasons.  Here are some great examples of using trees for colour contrast.  See this post for some other suggestions for plants - Jungle Effects
 Photo by Trish Symons www.trishsymons.com

 Photo by Trish Symons www.trishsymons.com

  • When planting shrubs and trees consider ones that turn colour in the fall and look interesting when covered in snow.
Just remember when removing something consider it's bloom time and colour.  Do you want to replace it with something that is similar or completely different?

What do you do with all those plants you are no longer in love with?
  • Donate them to you Horticulture plant sale
  • Donate to a church or other community building with gardens
  • Gift them to a new gardener
  • or if it is a troublesome plant not worth passing on compost it.
Here are some things to consider when improving and designing your garden.
  • Marian Jarvie's rule of six.  Let your eye travel your garden and you should be able to see things at 6 different levels or heights, this helps keep the garden interesting and creates depth
  • Consider keeping it to 3 colours per garden it is simpler and more pleasing to the eye.
  • Look around are there any views that you could frame with shurbs or trees? Or are there views that you would like your garden to hide from view when looking out of windows or sitting on a deck?
  • Add scent to your garden - things like thyme, lavender, a lilac bush (Japanese Silk and Ludwig Spaeth varieties), and flowering crab trees give off wonderful scents for you to enjoy

Flowering Crab: Photo by Annalea Kidd
  • Create a private secluded spot, and incorporate a simple flowing water feature into it if you can for a greater feeling of serenity.  Rock walls (old foundations), fences or hedges can create a great back drop for private spots.

 Photo from: Log Bench

Photo From: Stone bird baths 


Photo From: Succulents

Photo From: Fancy "Lighting"

Have fun "Editing UP!"

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Even though snow is in the air - Spring is just around the corner

Welcome back gardeners!

Our first meeting of the year will be help Tuesday, March 21st at the Agricultural Community Centre, 377 William St. at 7:30pm

The amazing speaker and gardener Trish Symons is speaking on the topic "Never Met a Hosta I Couldn't Love"  She has many hostas in her personal garden - if you ever have the chance to visit - it is a lovely garden

Photo by Trish Symons

Do you love gardening, or are thinking of starting a garden? Hostas are a great plant to start with.
Hope you can join us!

Monday, July 11, 2016

Jungle Effects

At our April meeting Trish Symons shared some amazing pictures with us and some suggestions for creating a jungle effect in your own garden either on a small or large scale.

Photo By: Chris Brown Left Beverley Farmer Right Trish Symons


Here are some of the elements she suggests to create a jungle effect
•  Looking in or looking out – by creating a “wall” with foliage with a peek-a-boo lookout
Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Have a strong contrasting background
•  Lots of foliage (not too many flowers) gives a dense and damp feeling like the jungle

Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Water elements create the hot humid damp feeling
Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Sensory – have things that brush against you, things tumbling into the path, hanging down
•  Create visual hidden surprises like large alliums amongst hostas or a sculpture, old iron pieces, decaying trunks, concrete pieces


Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Create your garden under a big canopy tree for filtered light
•  Lots of contrast with form, shape, colour, height and texture
•  For a smaller effect create a jungle container garden for the corner of a deck

Some plants she suggests
•  Fat Spike Amaranthus
•  Elephant Ears
•  Wisteria for twirly vine look
•  Fox tail Lilies
•  Angelia lime/purple
•  Digatalis Foxglove – at eye view, this needs to be staked
•  New Zealand Flax Chocolate – great for floral design as well
•  Japanese Maple – a type of tree that a troup of monkeys might hang out in
•  Canna – Tropicana


Photo By: Trish Symons (Pretoria Canna)

•  Black Sweet potato vine for contrast and growing on things like stumps and sculptures
•  Willow Tree – for the looking in/looking out concept
•  Cabaret Ornamental grass – plant in old tree trunks
•  Japanese anemone
•  Taro elephant ears – huge leaves can be grown in a pot or ground
•  Virginia Creeper – for fall colour 

Jungle Effects

At our April meeting Trish Symons shared some amazing pictures with us and some suggestions for creating a jungle effect in your own garden either on a small or large scale.

Here are some of the elements she suggests to create a jungle effect
•  Looking in or looking out – by creating a “wall” with foliage with a peek-a-boo lookout
Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Have a strong contrasting background
•  Lots of foliage (not too many flowers) gives a dense and damp feeling like the jungle

Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Water elements create the hot humid damp feeling
Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Sensory – have things that brush against you, things tumbling into the path, hanging down
•  Create visual hidden surprises like large alliums amongst hostas or a sculpture, old iron pieces, decaying trunks, concrete pieces


Photo By: Trish Symons

•  Create your garden under a big canopy tree for filtered light
•  Lots of contrast with form, shape, colour, height and texture
•  For a smaller effect create a jungle container garden for the corner of a deck

Some plants she suggests
•  Fat Spike Amaranthus
•  Elephant Ears
•  Wisteria for twirly vine look
•  Fox tail Lilies
•  Angelia lime/purple
•  Digatalis Foxglove – at eye view, this needs to be staked
•  New Zealand Flax Chocolate – great for floral design as well
•  Japanese Maple – a type of tree that a troup of monkeys might hang out in
•  Canna – Tropicana


Photo By: Trish Symons (Pretoria Canna)

•  Black Sweet potato vine for contrast and growing on things like stumps and sculptures
•  Willow Tree – for the looking in/looking out concept
•  Cabaret Ornamental grass – plant in old tree trunks
•  Japanese anemone
•  Taro elephant ears – huge leaves can be grown in a pot or ground
•  Virginia Creeper – for fall colour 

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Dufferin Garden Centre

The Horticulture society is donating a tree to the Honouring Fallen Soliders project along the highway.   Read more about it here


Donna Zarudny (left) with Bev Farmer featuring one of the new hostas.
Photo by Colette Whiting

At the May meeting Donna Zarudny from Dufferin Garden Centre introduced us to a fabulous variety of new and exciting perennials.  The trend is leaning to compact, more drought tolerant, able to stand on its own and flowering for longer.

Dufferin Garden Centre has started a line of labels that lets you know which plants are bee friendly.  Look for the yellow bee sticker.  They are also carrying a lot more heritage and native plants that pollinators look for first.  Please consider adding a cluster of these to your garden somewhere.  Pollinators like clusters of flowers.
Bees in particular like blue, yellow, purple and white flowers
Make sure you put different shaped flowers as different pollinators like different shapes/textures
Consider plants that are in bloom in different times so there are always flowers for them.
Bees houses – make sure they are in a protected area.
Read more about what they are doing here.

She suggests planting high colour contrast things together and in clusters of 3 to create a “WOW” factor in your garden.
For an interesting low maintenance container garden, plant different hens and chicks and sedums in small pots and group together.  Take into consideration cobweb style, texture, colour, height.  She shared a sample of one with us that was beautiful, they could be used for creating small fairy gardens.  See some of the creations that were made at one of their recent classes here 

The 2016 Perennial is Anemone Homrine Jobert – 3-4 feet

Other new plants this year

Holly Hocks Alcea Halo – red/yellow – 6 Feet Bi-Annual

Astrantia – Midnight Owl – 30” High
Zone 3 A beautiful purple flowers from May – September does need to be deadheaded
Full sun/part sun likes morning sun
I will be adding this one to my garden this year.

Campuanula – Iridescent Bells
Zone 5 – May – September blooms
The bees love these

Cone Flowers – Echinacea Butterfly Rainbow – 18”
Blooms Spring – Frost
Needs 6 hours of sun
Other varieties to look at for contrast – Tomato soup and Mac and Cheese

Hemerocellas – San Luis Halloween – 6” blooms
Blooms spring – fall
Drought tolerant

Heuchera – Grape expectation
Zone 4 – gorgeous deep purple leaves
Drought tolerate – likes morning sun
Use this with a lime coloured hosta to create a “wow” contrast point in your garden

Hostas - House Mouse
Zone 3 – Shade, slug resistant
Blue/green wavy leaves, perfect for a rock garden

Hosta – Cool as a cucumber
Zone 2 – long tapered leaves with white centre and vivid green edge
Has lavender blooms

Hosta – Hulk
High contrast – pointy leaves

Lavendula Augustifolia – Dwarf Blue – 12”
Drought tolerant great for rock garden – don’t completely cut back only take ~5” off the top
(the munsted variety is a very good pollinator just make sure you mulch it really well for the first year)

Leucanthum Spellbook Lumos (daises)
Zone 5 Spring – Summer bloom
These must be dead headed

Penstemon x Mexicali – Carillo Rose – 10-12”
Zone 5 Late spring – fall bloom
Heat and drought tolerant good for container and rock gardens

Lychnis – Petite Jenny
Zone 3 – Spring – Early summer blooms

Weigela Tuxedo – Shrub – 2’x4’
Low maintenance – white flower

Viola – Frizzle Sizzle
Spring – Fall bloom
Needs to be dead headed

Join us June 21 at the Royal Canadian Legion at 7:30.  Our guest speaker Shannon Stephens of Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority will be speaking on “Water conservation and Buffer Plants”

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Landman Gardens and Bakery


Left: Colette Whiting Right: Rebecaa Landma Photo by Cathy Brown

Our March speaker was Rebecca Landman from Landman Gardens and Bakery.  
Rebecca has a varied education ranging from culinary management at Canadore College and sustainable agriculture at Fleming College.  She and her family provide GMO-free, anti biotic free and hormone-free meats and  farm fresh eggs as well as delicious baking and fresh produce along with delicious jams, salsas and pickles.

In their gorgeous dry stone house on the property they offer 5 course gourmet "Blackhouse" dinners made with products from their farm.  If you are looking for a special experience book one of their themed dinners!

Landman farms are located at 322345 conc 6-7.  just off county road 25 between highway 89 and grand valley.  You can also visit them on Thursdays at the Shelburne Farmers market and on Saturdays at the Orangeville market